adcouncil:

Give someone a cure to their case of the Mondays. Inspire change, improve lives.

adcouncil:

Give someone a cure to their case of the Mondays. Inspire change, improve lives.

(Source: icanread)

I wonder. Is education the kind of the thing that we have so taken for granted in the US, that we begrudge it, that because it is required, far too many regard it as a nuissance.  Do Good by supporting education both in your own country, but around the world.  A mind, it truly is a terrible thing to waste. unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK - 14 October 2013Laboni, 10, lives in a Dhaka slum in Bangladesh and attends a nearby school run by a UNICEF partner. Economic and gender disparities in Bangladesh hamper the fulfilment of child rights, including in education. Children from the poorest families are significantly less likely than their richest peers to be registered at birth, limiting their access to social services like school. For girls, the risk of early marriage presents additional threats to their educational achievement.
©UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani

I wonder. Is education the kind of the thing that we have so taken for granted in the US, that we begrudge it, that because it is required, far too many regard it as a nuissance.  Do Good by supporting education both in your own country, but around the world.  A mind, it truly is a terrible thing to waste. unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK - 14 October 2013
Laboni, 10, lives in a Dhaka slum in Bangladesh and attends a nearby school run by a UNICEF partner. Economic and gender disparities in Bangladesh hamper the fulfilment of child rights, including in education. Children from the poorest families are significantly less likely than their richest peers to be registered at birth, limiting their access to social services like school. For girls, the risk of early marriage presents additional threats to their educational achievement.

©UNICEF/Shehzad Noorani

pulitzercenter:

Meet, for example, Regina Gisput. At 16, she is as ambitious as any Minnesota girl her age, studying a heavy load of physics, chemistry and math in hopes of becoming a doctor.

Few American girls, though, have faced obstacles as formidable as she is fighting. When Regina was 13 years old, her father expected her to marry as was the custom in her rural Maasai village. Her family needed the bride-price a groom would pay either in cash or in livestock.

Regina knew all too well her future in that married life. She had seen that future through the lives of girls and women in her village: She would work at hard labor for her husband, likely an older man with other wives. She would bear children before her own child body was fully formed and ready to deliver them. She would own very little; and if her husband died before her, his land, cattle and other possessions would pass to his family.

Regina made a bold escape from that destiny.

At her primary school, she had taken a qualification exam for secondary school. She passed. And the head of the primary school told her on the last school day that she could leave immediately for the MaaSAE school in Monduli without going home.

Regina took the offer. And she arrived at the boarding school, like many of her fellow students, with nothing but the clothes she had worn that day.

It was effectively a one-way decision for Regina. She can’t go back to her village.

Keep reading Pulitzer Center grantee Sharon Schmickle’s report about girls’ fight for education in Tanzania here. Images by Sharon Schmickle. Tanzania, 2013.

percentforartnyc:

For two days every year, Open House New York (OHNY) Weekend gives the public a chance to engage more deeply with the built environment and learn more about aspects our city that are often hidden in plain sight. This year Percent for Art commissions in two boroughs will be featured in the weekend’s activities on October 12 &13, located in New York Public Library’s Bronx Library Center, and Queens Public Library’s branches in Long Island City and Flushing. The pieces, pictured above, range from architectural elements like Yong Soon Min’s etched glass wall to interior features like Iñigo Manglano Ovalle’s exploration of DNA as a catalog, reflecting the diverse ways permanent art can enhance our public spaces.

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(via nypl)

adcouncil:

Read more on AdLibbing.

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We love this family more than we can express.  When we first discovered this beautiful family we fell in love with their heart, their courage, their belief, their hope, and of course, this sweet, brave, beautiful boy.  Please watch their story.  Send them love in your comments. Send them your positive thoughts.  Miracles can happen.  Love can do great good.

goodneighborsusa:

We’re heading to LA’s Green Festival Oct. 19-20 at the LA Mart in Downtown Los Angeles! Come visit our booth and learn how we’re building life-saving, energy-efficient cookstoves for families in Guatemala. Also, spend the day checking out tons of eco-friendly exhibitors! Tickets start at $10.

goodneighborsusa:

We’re heading to LA’s Green Festival Oct. 19-20 at the LA Mart in Downtown Los Angeles! Come visit our booth and learn how we’re building life-saving, energy-efficient cookstoves for families in Guatemala. Also, spend the day checking out tons of eco-friendly exhibitors! Tickets start at $10.

pulitzercenter:

Around the world, child marriage keeps millions of young girls out of school every year.

“Denying a girl her right to education also denies her the opportunity to make choices in work and life…Girls with secondary education can find fulfilling work, be married to someone of their choice, have the number of children they want, and make sure their children are educated in their turn. The right to education opens the way to the exercise of other human rights,” explains the website Too Young to Wed, part of a multimedia project spearheaded by Pulitzer Center grantee Stephanie Sinclair.

The Day of the Girl is on October 11 and this year, the theme is education. Join us and PBS NewsHour in celebrating by sharing what girls’ education looks like where you live. Use #girlsglobaled on Instagram, Pinterest, Twitter or Facebook to share a photo, video or story about what you experience.

fairtradeusa:

We’re extra grateful for all you dreamers who are helping change the world!

fairtradeusa:

We’re extra grateful for all you dreamers who are helping change the world!

A Chinese woman who has spent her life in poverty is being hailed a hero for selflessly saving dozens of abandoned babies over the course of her lifetime. According to Chinese newspaper Yanzhao Metro Daily, 88-year-old Lou Xiaoying has rescued more than 30 abandoned babies from the streets of Jinhua, China, over the past four decades.

A Chinese woman who has spent her life in poverty is being hailed a hero for selflessly saving dozens of abandoned babies over the course of her lifetime. According to Chinese newspaper Yanzhao Metro Daily, 88-year-old Lou Xiaoying has rescued more than 30 abandoned babies from the streets of Jinhua, China, over the past four decades.